Adoramapix

Jan 2013 09
Just because there is snow on the ground and the temperature is dipping  there is no reason why you still can’t  be creative outside with your photo shoot.  I recently ran across members Paul and Sylvia Nelson who made a photo book and literally blew me out of the water with their Snow Queen shoot. They were lovely enough to share with us some tips on how to make the best of a stylized shoot in the snow.
Paul and Sylvia Nelson of Paul & Sylvia | Photography & Design are Toronto and destination wedding photographers, world travelers, a team in love who love to photograph other people. Great people, great relationships, and positive outlook fuel their lives and their business.  It’s about making a connection with every client and every person they encounter.
You can follow them on their Facebook page,Twitter, and our website.
Here are some tips from Paul and Sylvia on their Snow Queen photo shoot.
It’s no secret that creative wedding inspired photo shoots have their challenges, but when Sylvia started planning one for a winter’s day in central Ontario I knew those challenges would be unique.  Inspired by one of her favourite books as a child, Sylvia’s vision for “The Snow Queen” took off.  Shooting in mid February we hadn’t really thought of the lack of snow as being an issue, but as one of the warmest winters on record continued, it quickly became one.  Some last minute location changes had to be made to find the most snow we could.  Living in Canada, one rarely hopes for more snow in winter!  After some creative shovelling and re-shovelling of snow, we were ready to shoot.

With some light snow on and off and occasional 10 minute snow storms throughout the day, we learned quickly that we couldn’t move anything on the table set up. If we did, you could easily see were we had disturbed the snow, which would have to involve more postproduction work in photoshop.  A lesson in making sure its right the first time!  With several set ups in various spots and with cold temperatures I wanted to keep the lighting portable and simple.  Speedlights with some simple modifiers were the way to go.  As we know,  proper exposure can be tricky on the snow.  A little over exposure kept the snow a crisp white, I found about +2/3 of a stop seemed to do the trick.  You also have to consider your white balance, especially if you want to consider submitting your images to a magazine as they always look for color consistency.  We had to consider how our images are going to look when we shot in natural light, with flash, in sunlight, in the shadows of evergreens, in a snowstorm, etc.  The white balance was changing constantly.  Looking back we wish we would have had the expo disk to make the job easier for post production.  Facing all these challenges of shooting in the snow you have to also make sure you’re shooting in RAW format.

Sun up till sun down, it was a long day.  We had two awesome table set-ups,  an amazing ice bar, a gorgeous cake and the models.  All this had to be shot between warming up!  Being a wedding photographer, I find myself at complete ease during creative shoots.  You just don’t get this kind of time and control at a wedding.

Winter shoots seldom seem to have a game plan set in stone.  You find yourself shooting between set ups quickly, all according to the weather.  If this is something your willing to take on, the biggest words of advice we have for you is to surround yourself with good vendors.  Good, experienced people make a world of difference.  Happy shooting my friends.

 

For more photos from the shoot please click  HERE. 
If you would like to see the finished photo book click on the image below or you can click HERE.
Thank you so much Paul and Sylvia for sharing your experience with us, your work is simply stunning.

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