Adoramapix

Nov 2011 24
Welcome to our Weekly Member Feature — where we feature our wonderful clients.
This week we get the opportunity to visit with Kelly and Stacey Chance of  Discovery Bay Studios  in Discovery Bay, California.
I asked Stacey how they first started out in . He said, ” We have always loved doing all sorts of . A few years ago we decided to challenge ourselves with wedding . We wanted to raise the bar and provide our clients with the most comprehensive, romantic, and unique coverage. We are photographers first, but we also add splashes of cinematic video to our photofusion music videos. And there is nothing better than “s quality books to display our printed work!”

I asked Stacey if he had any advice to new photographers staring out in the business. He replied, “New photographers should be open to learning through books, magazines, internet, etc. Find images that inspire you and ask yourself, “How did they do that?” Then figure it out. Go with what looks good to you. Be yourself, that is where you will find your best strengths.”
I followed up with him asking, who inspires you? He stated, ”  We are inspired by many photographers, too many to mention. We try to appreciate the wide variety of styles we see in wedding photography, but always come back to the style that feels right in our hearts.”
Nov 2011 28
Our Member of the week is : Patrick Smith of Patrick Smith Photos.  Patrick is an amazing photojournalist from Maryland.
I noticed each of his photos tells an interesting story and his lighting is exceptional. I asked him how long he had been a photographer. He said, ” I’ve been shooting pictures since sometime in high school. I did a lotof video work in my late years of high school, which developed into a love of photojournalism in college.”
I was curious to know what his favorite subject to photograph was. He replied, ” I am a versatile photojournalist, so I shoot a range of assignments from professional sports to news events. It’s difficult to say what I like the most since I enjoy it all. I love to deliver the compelling images of newsworthy and sporting events to those around the world. I also enjoy wandering in foreign cities and countries shooting feature pictures.”
Patrick says he gets his inspiration from other photojournalists and friends — this list is long.  He would also want to thank photojournalists and editors, young and old, for continually pushing him by producing their own amazing works.
I asked him if he could give himself a piece of advice when he was first starting out – what would it be? He replied, ” That’s a difficult question. As a photojournalist, I wish I would havedone some more internships and got to meet and learn from more talented photographers. But I don’t think I would change anything. I love learning. Life is a journey.”
So we want to know Patrick — what’s in your camera bag?   He said, ” Too much to carry, that’s for sure! I’m well versed in both Canon and  Nikon systems, but grew up on Nikon. I shoot with Nikon D3S and D700 camera bodies. I also have a full gamut of lenses ranging from a 35mm f/2 to a 400mm f/2.8. I am also a huge ThinkTank Photo fan. I have a bunch of their rolling bags and accessories, including the ThinkTank  International 2.0 and their waist belt and pouches.”
Thanks Patrick for being an inspiration and sharing your work.
Dec 2011 14
Welcome to Member of the Week!  This week we meet Gordon Brugman of Smoky Moments Photography. 
Gordon has been photographing for over 30 years. I asked him what he loves to photograph the most, he replied, ” Landscapes and wildlife of the Great Smoky Mountains, using HDR photography, Ortonization and Photoshop techniques to share the beauty of my backyard with the world. “
Gordon says he gets his inspiration from the natural beauty of the everchanging Smoky Mountains. I asked him what was in his bag, he said, ” I shoot pretty simple, believing the eye is the most important photographic equipment at my disposal. My go-to camera is a simple Nikon D5000 using either an 18-55 Nikon zoom lens or my Tamron AF 70-300 Tele-Macro zoom lens. A 25 year old Slik Tripod (old school!), polarizers and a Nikon remote shutter trigger pretty much complete the package.”
I asked him if he could go back in time and give his younger self some advice, what would it be? He replied, “Consider every image an opportunity to hone your skills, learn techniques and advance your art, but not until first appreciating the moment in time you are about to capture. “
Thank you Gordon your work is beautiful and so are your words.

Jan 2012 05

It’s a new year and we kick off the Member of the Week with the amazingly talented Adam Mooshian of Adam Mooshian Photography : www.adammoosh.com .

His work is breathtaking, and I asked him how he got started photographing horses. He replied, ” It all began in 2003 when a horse named Funny Cide won the Kentucky Derby and I thought he was just the coolest. I followed racing for many years before finally in 2008, I picked up a and decided I was going to start taking pictures of horses… knowing absolutely nothing about either. I showed up at our local race track and began taking “pictures.” After about three weeks of arguing with the , I began to figure out what I was doing. From there, I just kept learning what not to do to get the images I actually wanted!”

He has found his niche with photographing animals especially horses at the racetracks. This is where he gets his inspiration from..the horses themselves. He said, “They are such amazing animals with so much to offer. They are like humans, they have their own personalities and quirks. Some are goofy, some are shy, some love the , some love to stir up trouble. I mainly photograph thoroughbred racehorses. I often tell people I go to photograph the races but leave with a lesson. Some horses appear defeated, only to come back to win more determined than ever. Some appear so far out of it they have no shot only to win by a nose at the finish, and some are hard knocking and try hard but never get any credit or recognition. You can take a life lesson from them, if only you open yourself up to the idea of relating yourself to them!”

I asked him if he could give himself one piece of advice to himself when he was just starting out.. what would it be? He replied, “If I could give myself one piece of advice it would be not to get so down on myself about missing a shot or failing to capture it the way I wanted. At the time, it is a terrible feeling, but from it you learn how not to make the same mistake again. For every amazing shot you feel you may miss, think of the shot that you will get as a result of it. Failure is only true if you believe it!”

So Adam, What’s in your bag? He answered, “My camera bag has too much stuff in it. I often abandon it the first chance I get and travel around like a wild man with things hanging off of me. I have the standard, boring things that every photographer carries and a few little mementos that people have given me along the way. I carry a Koala Bear with a boomerang and take his picture wherever I go (a photographer I met from, you guessed it, Australia gave it to me. He is a traveling Koloa Bear!) I also have the first credential I was ever given three years ago to remind myself of where I came from. Hmm, what else… oh, cant forget the most important one… chocolate! When all else fails, chocolate is always the answer, don’t leave home without it. Yeah, I clearly have my priorities in order.”

Thank you Adam, your work is amazing and beautiful. You can see more of his work on his website www.adammoosh.com. (BTW if you are wondering, yes this young gun is only 25-years-old!)

Jan 2012 16

Our Member of the Week comes to us from the West Coast – it’s Sean Hoyt from Seattle, Washington. Sean is no stranger to Adoramapix, he has already purchased more than 80 of our photo books and continues to impress us with his work.

Sean has been professionally photographing since 2005 and just recently picked up THE KNOT award for the Best of Weddings 2011.   Before he turned professional shutterbug, he was a graduate research assistant in electrical engineering working on robotics and circuit design.  He entered the field because of the technical challenges mixed with the psychological and artistic components. He says it’s the best of all worlds.

I asked Sean what his favorite subject to photograph was and he replied, “I enjoy photographing people and love. This could be two people  “in love” or family bonds. I use photography to express those connections.”

So Sean, knowing what you know today, if you could go back in time and give yourself some advice, what would it be?  He answered, “I would join more groups to learn from other peoples’ mistakes and triumphs. Peers also challenge and inspire me to innovate and be more creative. I’ve never been secretive about how I do my business. I think the artistry, personality and mastery of equipment is what distinguishes good from the not-so-good photographers.”

I was curious to know where Sean receives his inspiration from, he said, “Facebook is becoming huge and I follow a ton of photographers’ daily postings. I also take inspiration directly from my clients as they each have a unique story to tell. They’ve also likely done a bunch of fieldwork and bring ideas to the table. One of my favorite photographs from my portfolio is of a brial party in blue store windows. We did a bunch of prep work and bounced ideas off each other before the wedding so we could go into it and have fun. It worked out really well.”

When Sean first started out, he was toting around a D70 with a 70-200mm 2.8 lens. I asked him what he’s toting around today , he replied, “Nikon D3s, D3, D200 bodies. Nikon 24-70 2.8, 70-200 2.8, 50mm 1.4 and Tamron 11-18 DX lens that I use on the FX D3s. …I use SB-800s with Pocket Wizards and a portable beauty dish for engagement and family sessions, but have 500Ws Bowens monolights with batteries for bigger groups. Also, I  have 128GB of CF memory and a cool Custom Brackets C rotating bracket. It all goes in my ThinkTank Urban Disguise 70V2.0 bag which can hold a pro body and a telephoto lens upright in the center column. Best. Bag.  Ever.”

So what’s in the future for Sean, besides the Nikon D4? He said, “I am  actively transitioning into a hybrid “fusion” market where I will deliver both photographs and highlight films to my clients. If you thought stills photography was a challenge, try doing film. It’s immensely more difficult and rewarding.”

 

 

Thank you Sean for sharing, your work is both breath-taking and inspirational.  So if you would like to see more of his work on facebook you can click HERE.  If is your thing, feel free to follow him HERE.

 



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