Feb 2014 12

The Wedding and Portrait Photography International Conference (AKA WPPI) is just a few weeks away.  We will be exhibiting at the show and featuring our amazing lay-flat photo books, metal and canvas prints . We are looking forward to meeting you and we will have a lot of swag to Spin and Win.

We are also honored to have with us Erin Gilmore of Erin Gilmore Photography . She hails from British Columbia and was voted one of the most inspiring wedding photographers in Canada. She will be at our booth spending one on one time with our members . She has an impressive resume’ and will answer all of your questions from marketing to shooting to post production. You have 15 minutes to get the direct answers you need from an award winning wedding photographer. If you want her to review your portfolio, no problem bring it along.  So reserve your spot today by emailing libby@adoramapix.com: see dates and times below. We look forward to seeing you in Vegas.

unnamed (41)

Feb 2014 11

It’s cold, it’s wet, it’s winter and you’ve just lost all your ambition to photograph. It’s ok, don’t force yourself. Often the winter months are a time for photographers to relax and rejuvenate. However, it doesn’t mean just because Mother Nature is against you that you just stop photographing all together. Instead, see it as a challenge and reignite your creativity. Here are 5 tips on how to warm up your creativity during the cold months.

1. Experiment 

You don’t need to go out and buy the latest gear to make a great image.  Use what you have, but maybe use it in a different way. Challenge yourself to think outside the box.  The best person to demonstrate this point is Alexey Kijatov from Moscow. He made some incredibly powerful images of snowflakes using his Canon Powershot A650 along with a  Helios 44M-5. Photography is a hobby for him that he started about 10-12 years ago.

Through a lot of experimentation he was able to create something incredible and beautiful using only what he had, but in a different light. You can view his behind the scenes set up HERE. You can also view more of his astonishing work HERE. 

flake1 flake2 flake3 flake4 flake5 flake6 flake7 flake8 flake9 flake10

[Images from Alexey Kljatov]

2. Same Thing Different Day

I started noticing on my daily walk that there was a certain tree that although completely bare, changed from day to day by its inhabitants. So every day, I challenged myself to photograph it. I used different lenses different angles and different post processing. There were some I wasn’t quite happy with but overall I enjoyed the challenge of shooting the same thing every day but showing the daily changes.

IMG_1178 IMG_0573

[Images from Libby from Adoramapix]

 

3. Inside/Outside

Shoot the outside from the inside or the inside from the outside. Windows  lend themselves as great natural filters. It’s fun knowing the rain or snow on the window is temporary and this filter has a short life span.

1017408_10151969894668507_1542081608_n

[Image from Saul Blumenthal saul@saulb.com www.saulb.com]

4.  Post Production Push

So you have your look down and you are known for it. So, let’s take some time out and do the exact opposite. If you are known for your crisp color images, try some different black and white techniques. If you are known for your dark, dramatic images try incorporating lighter elements.

pp2 pp1

[Stock Photography]

5. Bring a +1

Head outdoors and bring a photographer friend. Photograph the same scene or object then compare. It’s fun to see through another person’s view finder. I have my preferred method of shooting leaving a lot of negative space so for me I like to go with people who fill the frame. You are never too old to learn or to appreciate another angle.

This post is not necessarily for business use, it’s merely for personal reflection and inspiration. The winter months can be a tough time to find your creativity you  have to work at it, to keep yourself inspired. I hope some of these tips will help you get up and get creative.

Written by Libby for Adoramapix

 

 

Feb 2014 06

Each week we like to give you tips and ideas on photo books and our PixPublisher software. We thought we’d start with the basics. If you’ve never used our PixPublisher to design a photo book before, it’s easy.  Here is part one to introduce you to the basics.

Feb 2014 04

Valentine’s Day is one of my all time favorite events to photograph little ones. I love to include the  hearts, the kisses and the hugs. But let’s face it, not a lot of people will book a full session just around Valentine’s Day. So you might want to consider doing mini-sessions, but before you do there are a few things you need to get lined up before pressing the shutter. Here are 5 tips :

1. Do Your Math

vDAYMini-Sessions are all about the numbers  from the pricing to the session timing.. You want to do a lot of mini sessions but at what price point do you make a profit ? Each market is different, do your research and start with a price point for the session that includes your time and a takeaway for your client. I like to include a 5×7 print, something tangible from the session. My hope is they will buy  more but just in case they don’t, I know I still had a session at my price point. Because these are mini-sessions, I usually collect my session fee prior to the session.

Next on math, figure out how long your mini- sessions will last. Stick to this number for each client and make sure they are aware of the session time and schedule. I’ll get everyone involved and have the kids sometimes push my stop watch to start the session time. Not each mini-session will go well under a tight schedule. You’ll also need to figure out scenarios before your mini sessions. If a child does not co-operate, what will you do? Offer a reshoot? Bank it for Later? Are they out of the session fee? These are all things to consider before conducting your sessions.

 2. Marketing

BabyNate (1)

Since these are mini-sessions you’ll want to market them in a way that let’s the clients know this is special and fun and LIMITED. This way you are setting the tone, that you are only taking a certain number of sessions and that this is maybe a once a year type of offer. If you offer mini-sessions constantly, they start to lose their appeal and are no longer special.

3. Do Your Homework

Blog 10

Education is key to mini sessions from yourself to your clients, everyone should know what to expect. I like to email helpful information to the clients before the session. It includes a map to the location, their time slot, and  some links to clothing ideas and of course my cell phone number. On the day of the sessions, I print out a sheet of paper with family names, names of children and ages.

 

4. Make it Easy

BabyNate (4)

Don’t try to do it all, having a helper on the day of the mini-sessions can make the difference between a great day and a bad day. I did mini sessions before on my own, but towards the end of the day found myself more worn out and scattered after running back and forth from client to camera. With your assistant, give them all of the information and have them help set the family /child up for the poses. They can help primp and pose your subjects and of course they are the spotter in case you miss something you didn’t see as well as the child wrangler. They can also greet the family when they come and then help them pick up and leave after the session.

Make sure they understand this is not like your regular sessions, that they will not be able to change clothes or take time for snacks or feedings. I typically, will persuade parents of newborns to schedule a full session. It is nearly impossible to do a newborn for a mini-session and you don’t want to set their expectations to a standard that you just can’t keep.

Pick a great location. I have done both outside and studio sessions. Studio is obviously more controlled but I enjoyed being outside just for some different looks. If you choose an outdoor location, include a map and make sure it’s easy to get to. Just because you found an amazing spot in the middle of the woods, doesn’t mean it’s right for mini-sessions if no one can find it.

5. Post Session

family (64)

The back-end of the session is just as important as the first. You’ll want to streamline this as much as possible. Since it was a mini session, the number of images your clients should receive should be about 1/3 of what you normally offer. Make it as easy as possible as far as viewing and ordering. Give them expectations on the back-end as well, let them know they only have 2 weeks to order images after their gallery is released to them. Again, we are going back to the tip number one, it’s important to know your numbers when running mini-sessions.

I hope some of these tips well help you along your way in conducting successful mini-sessions.

[Blog Post and Photography by Libby for Adoramapix]

Jan 2014 30

Well, it’s official 2013 is no more, hello to 2014.  What better way to remember 2013 than to make a family year photo book? Sound daunting going through all of those images? It doesn’t have to be at all when you have a plan. We asked Adoramapix member Jennie Canzoneri on how to make the Family Yearbook.

The Perfect Family Yearbook

When you hear “yearbook,” you likely think of the book you passed around to all your high school friends, watching it get filled with promises to “stay in touch” and “be friends forever.”

Thanks to AdoramaPix (and all those ridiculous high school memories), I’m reclaiming the word “yearbook” to mean a photo book filled with memories from any given year. Something to proudly display now instead of something to gather dust in my attic forever.

 

photo1

 

A few years ago, I set out to make a photo book to remember the previous year, and I wanted to pick the perfect photo website. I wanted ease of use but, more importantly, I wanted a quality book I could look at with fondness for years to come. A book I could pass along to my son one day, too, since we started this family yearbook tradition when he was barely two years old. These would become the books of his life.

I found AdoramaPix through a Pinterest search, and I spent the next few days (okay, maybe weeks, I’m a bit of a perfectionist!) putting my first book together. Now that I have three of these books under my belt, I have some tips to help you put together a yearbook you’ll love, as well.

  • Organize your photos as you upload them to your computer! Thankfully, iPhoto does this for me, but I take it a step further and flag (and try to edit in real time) every photo that I think may end up in the yearbook, so that when it’s time to upload to AdoramaPix, I’m uploading from one folder and not a dozen different places.

  • I make a list of the events I want to highlight. I usually include birthdays, vacations, holidays, and special occasions, but I also try to fill in a few extra “general” pages: a page dedicated to the friends that made our year special, my son’s first few soccer seasons, etc. Writing this list before I start my yearbook helps ensure I don’t forget any important events and that my book’s in the order I want it.

  • This is probably the most important one, but pick up your camera throughout the year! Because of these yearbooks, I leave the house with my camera more often. Not just my phone’s camera, which we’re all a little too dependent on these days, am I right? But my other, fancier cameras too. Camera photos work just fine in the AdraoamaPix books, I should say, but I like to add more “professional” photos, as well.

Once you have all your photos uploaded to AdromaPix, and you begin laying out your yearbook, I suggest you make it as unique as possible. Change the spreads around, add fun graphics, adjust photo sizes, and make the fonts what you want them to be. The default yearbook is awesome, and if you’re stretched thin, it’ll make a fabulous book. But when I get my book in my hands, it feels that much more special because of how unique I’ve made it.

photo2

I’ve introduced a ton of family traditions over the years (breakfast for dinner on Christmas Eve, a huge brunch on Easter morning, lighting Chinese lanterns on birthdays) but our family yearbook through AdroamaPix is easily one of my favorites.

photo3

Thanks to member Jennie Canzoneri for her help on how to create the family yearbook.


  1. Copyright © 2010 AdoramaPix inc. All Right Reserved 42 W 18th St. NYC, NY 10011, 800.637.6880
  2. For technical difficulties please contact our webmaster
  3. follow us on twitter follow us on facebook watch us on YouTube