Nov 2013 19

So have the rules changed now that smartphones are capturing more photos a day than dslrs? As a photographer you’re generally concerned with all the details, button and dials to make everything work and create an image. However with the smartphone, we get to take a step back and simplify things a bit.

Guest Blogger, Kate Hailey is a freelance portrait photographer in Seattle and an avid iPhoneographer. I noticed her work a few years ago and instantly was intrigued by the way she photographed with her smartphone.  Over the past four years, she’s thoroughly enjoyed her  photographic journey via the iPhone. She shares with us some tips on composition with the smartphone.

While simplicity is fabulous and many individuals use their smart phones to document their day to day lives by taking snapshots, I always make the effort compose my images with care.

I thought I’d share some of my best tips to master composition, “in camera” with your smartphone.

 

1. Rule of Thirds

There’s a long standing rule of not having your main subject, smack dab in the middle of your image. Envision a grid (pictured below), you have 9 segments in that grid, your main subject should be placed along the right third, left third, top third or bottom third. Whichever strikes your fancy, this is generally considered more visually pleasing. This concept also applies to painting and filmmaking.

katehailey_ruleofthirds

2. Leading Lines

When we look at a photograph, our eyes are drawn along lines, pulled in, led left, reaching right etc… with leading lines we can direct the viewers eye.

katehailey_leadinglines

3. Symmetry + Patterns

There’s something rather appealing about symmetry and something intriguing about patterns. Look for a scene that has balance and symmetry. Or to change things up, seek out repetition.

katehailey_symmetrypatterns

4. Point of View

We’re all different heights, so we all see the world a little different. If a scene looks interesting to you, but you feel like the angle is just not right, even after trying a couple of snaps. Stand up on something, sit down on something, or even lay on the ground. You never know how changing your perspective this way, might be just pay off!

katehailey_pointofview

 

5. Background

Is the background of your image adding to or distracting from your main subject. If it’s distracting, then move your subject, if you can’t move your subject, then move yourself to a different spot where hopefully you can better capture your main subject.

katehailey_background

I hope these tips help you out. All of these images were captured and edited on an iPhone4s. – Kate

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Thank you Kate for your insight. To view more of Kate’s amazing iphone work you can see visit her BLOG and of course you can follow her on Instagram, her handle is @katehailey. 

 

 

Nov 2013 18

We are thrilled to welcome back Natascha Lee of Natascha Lee Studios to our webinar roster. Last year, Natascha Lee hosted one of our most successful webinars to date. The reviews on her Family Affair Webinar were outstanding so we asked her to join us again and she kindly agreed to share her knowledge and expertise with us.

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Natascha Lee  is a family photographer and artist based in Broomfield, Colorado. She specializes in vibrant and natural outdoor portraits. As you can see from her client testimonials,  clients select Natascha Lee Studios for both the artistic images created AND for the fun, memorable experience of the portrait session.
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In this invaluable and FREE webinar, Natascha will share her proven approach to Fabulous and Fun Family Photos, including:
 - Client prep to make your life easier
- Making the entire family comfortable in the first 10 minutes
- Keeping the experience fun, easy and moving
- Getting the most important shots, including the one most people forget about
- Ending the session on an upbeat note
…all leading to fun and profitable family portraits.
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Join Natascha on Sunday, December 1st,  9pm EST  for this invaluable and FREE session brought to you by Adoramapix and Natascha Lee Studios.
We also once again have generous door prizes for this webinar. Sponsors for the prizes include:
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Nov 2013 14

ADDING AND EDITING TEXT CAPTIONS

Even in a photo book, we sometimes need to add text. For those occasions, PixPublisher allows you to easily add text captions to any page.

    • ·         Start by clicking on the tab along the left side of your screen marked TEXT.
    • ·         On that tab you’ll see an icon with a T on it. Click on that icon, drag it over to your page and drop it roughly where you’d like the caption to be.
      text1text2

 

  • ·         This will add a text placeholder onto your page that looks something like this
  • ·         To edit the text, just double-click in the placeholder and enter your text.

ENTERING TEXT

    • ·         You have several options for entering text. You can type it in manually, or you can copy and paste it from somewhere else.
    • ·         If you would like to change the color, style, or size of just a portion of your text, you can do that also.
    • ·         Just select the portion of text you’d like to change.
      text3

 

    • ·         Click on the font size, color or style you would like to set it to on the toolbar that appears next to your selected text caption. You can change multiple settings if you wish.
      text4

 

    • ·         You’ll see the selected text change accordingly. In this case I made the selected text larger, italicized and red.
      text7

 

The ability to change portions of your text makes it easier for you to call attention to certain words in your captions, or to emphasize certain words or letters as a style choice. text5

* Please note that you are not able to change the font within a portion of selected text at this time.

CHANGING TEXT STYLE

When you add a text caption to a page, the caption will be set to the default for that book. In other words, if the standard text for that book is set to 26pt Arial in Medium Gray, and new captions you create will automatically be created at 26pt Arial in Medium Gray.

If you decide you’d like to add multiple captions in a different style, make your changes, and then click on the copy style option on the toolbar next to the selected text. This will replace the default style with the one you have selected. Any new text captions you drag onto your pages will automatically take on this new style.

Nov 2013 12
The holiday season is approaching fast and besides the hustle and the bustle of the season, comes some amazing feasts with friends and family. Ever wanted to know how the professionals photograph food? It’s more than just taking out your iphone and uploading it to Instagram. It requires skill, creativity and precision. Here is a look at 5 tips on photographing food.
1) Don’t use the on-camera flash.
Light coming straight at the food from the direction of the camera is not flattering. Place the food near a window and have the light come in from behind or to the side. Using a tripod helps tremendously.
Shadows from back side light
2) The bigger the window, the better the light but, don’t use direct sunlight. Direct sunlight causes harsh shadows and high contrast.
Filter the light or use indirect sunlight. A white translucent shower curtain makes a good filter.  A white reflector card can be used to lighten the shadow side.
Soft Window Light
3) If your food has texture, show it. Light from the side and show the texture.
Shadows show texture so don’t be afraid of shadows.
Texture
4) Watch your background and make sure that it doesn’t take away from what you want to say in your image.
Your photo has one hero and that hero should be the food-not the props or the background.
Make the food the hero
5) If your food has height, show it. Shoot at a low camera angle.
If your food is flat, but graphical, shoot from above. If you can’t decide, try shooting from a diner’s point of view.
Graphical shot from above
Special thanks to guest blogger Jerry Deutsch of Photography by Jerry, LLC. He has a passion for food photography and has been doing for 3 1/2 years now.  His work caught my eye when I was looking through members’ photo books and his latest portfolio blew me away. If you would like to view more of his work you can check out his website at Photography by Jerry, LLC. Here also is a look at his mouthwatering Adoramapix Photo Book.
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Nov 2013 07

Since our PixPublisher is so diverse and offers so many amazing assets, each week we will focus on one item to help you create an amazing photo book.

This week we want to show you how to have a smooth color fade. If you would like to have a smooth fade to a solid color you can do this using stickers. The easiest way to do this is to:

1. Open the stickers panel and type blend into the search box.

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2. Drag the sticker called softedge strip onto your page.

3.Rotate and stretch it so that the dark end fits against the solid color you want to blend to, and the sticker extends for the full length of the page. In the example photo below the sticker is highlighted to show where it was positioned.

4. Click on the color fill option and use the eyedropper to select the adjacent solid color so that the sticker’s edge transitions smoothly to that color.

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5. To make the fade more or less gradual just stretch the height of the sticker.

 

smooth_blend
 

We hope this little tip will help you create more unique and fun designs with our PixPublisher.


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