Nov 2012 26
We are thrilled to announce an exciting new webinar on Family Portraits!
Natascha Lee of Natascha Lee Studios is a family photographer and artist based in Broomfield, Colorado. She specializes in vibrant and natural outdoor portraits. As you can see from her client testimonials,  clients select Natascha Lee Studios for both the artistic images created AND for the fun, memorable experience of the portrait session.
In this invaluable and FREE webinar, Natascha will share her proven approach to Fabulous and Fun Family Photos, including:
- How to have your client show up prepared for the session
- How to make the entire family comfortable in the first 10 minutes
- How to keep the experience fun, easy and moving
- How to make sure you get the most important shots, including the one most people forget about
- How to end the session on an upbeat note
Join Natascha on Sunday, December 9th, 2012,  9pm EST  for this invaluable and FREE session brought to you by Adoramapix and Natascha Lee Studios.
Click  HERE to  Register
Baby, Children, and Family Portraits in Broomfield, Colorado by Natascha Lee Studios: Webinar
A Family Affair: Top 10 Tips for Amazing and Profitable Family Portraits
Free Webinar: December 9th, 9pm EST
Over $1,500 in door prizes generously donated by:
Click  The Button to  Register
Oct 2013 15

As photographers, we all know now is the busiest time for family portraits. As much as we love to photograph happy families, we also sweat bullets wondering how we can get a great picture and keep everyone happy. There are a few tips you may want to keep in mind when tackling the family unit.

1. Get it Off the Bat

I find that with new clients and old clients one thing always seems to work. Get the formal shot right off the bat when everyone is  listening and ready. You can get the casual shots later when they all relax and they start to lose interest.  I typically will take dad and have him sit in his position so I can get a good meter reading. This way I’m not wasting valuable time by trying to have children sit still while I figure out my exposure. Next, I’ll place mom and lastly the kids. I photograph full length and 3/4 right off the top. This way the first 10-15 minutes I spend getting the posed shot and knowing everything else is extra. The following image was the 8th photo I took of the family.

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2. Keep it Short

With younger families especially, time is crucial. Ever notice you start to lose the little one’s attention about 10 minutes in? It’s not you… it’s them. They need to be constantly moving and active. Anything more than 10-15 minutes and you’ve already lost your window.  Break after a few minutes, let them run around and relax.  Plan your next pose and start all over again.  The next image, I made everyone stand up just moments after everyone was sitting.

stephenson-174

 

3. Don’t Cut me Off

You have a lot of people in the portrait. That means you have a lot of feet and hands as well. Keep in mind to not cut off the feet or hands or fingers on full length portraits.  This is not to say you can’t get artistic and try different things.  Just make sure on the family formal portrait you get everything included in the first round, then you can experiment. Here you’ll see ll fingers and toes are accounted for in this image.

stephenson-19

 

4. Hold On

Little ones are active. It’s hard for them to sit still. Telling a child to put their hands down constantly while everyone else is ready  is stressful to the family. Keep it simple and give the little one something to hold in their hands.  Give them something seasonal, like say for instance a leaf or a pine cone to play with, this will keep their hands busy. If you look closely at this image, you’ll see the youngest has a small leaf in her hand.

stephenson-37

 

5. Loosen Up

Every family is quirky. It’s important to capture this as well. You know you got the formal pictures right off the top of the session, so now it’s time to have some fun. Loosen up and let them to hug or kiss. I typically say, tickle the funniest person in your family. The images are fun and relaxed and unexpected. It’s ok if not everyone is looking into the camera, the smile on their faces is worth a million bucks.

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written by Michelle Libby for Adoramapix

Nov 2013 18

We are thrilled to welcome back Natascha Lee of Natascha Lee Studios to our webinar roster. Last year, Natascha Lee hosted one of our most successful webinars to date. The reviews on her Family Affair Webinar were outstanding so we asked her to join us again and she kindly agreed to share her knowledge and expertise with us.

NataschaLee--Studios-EPL-sfw
Natascha Lee  is a family photographer and artist based in Broomfield, Colorado. She specializes in vibrant and natural outdoor portraits. As you can see from her client testimonials,  clients select Natascha Lee Studios for both the artistic images created AND for the fun, memorable experience of the portrait session.
18-IMG_5589-e-bw-dd-final-l-sfw
In this invaluable and FREE webinar, Natascha will share her proven approach to Fabulous and Fun Family Photos, including:
 - Client prep to make your life easier
- Making the entire family comfortable in the first 10 minutes
- Keeping the experience fun, easy and moving
- Getting the most important shots, including the one most people forget about
- Ending the session on an upbeat note
…all leading to fun and profitable family portraits.
IMG_8574-eal-sfw-natascha-lee-studios
Join Natascha on Sunday, December 1st,  9pm EST  for this invaluable and FREE session brought to you by Adoramapix and Natascha Lee Studios.
We also once again have generous door prizes for this webinar. Sponsors for the prizes include:
shutterstock_152596568
Feb 2014 04

Valentine’s Day is one of my all time favorite events to photograph little ones. I love to include the  hearts, the kisses and the hugs. But let’s face it, not a lot of people will book a full session just around Valentine’s Day. So you might want to consider doing mini-sessions, but before you do there are a few things you need to get lined up before pressing the shutter. Here are 5 tips :

1. Do Your Math

vDAYMini-Sessions are all about the numbers  from the pricing to the session timing.. You want to do a lot of mini sessions but at what price point do you make a profit ? Each market is different, do your research and start with a price point for the session that includes your time and a takeaway for your client. I like to include a 5×7 print, something tangible from the session. My hope is they will buy  more but just in case they don’t, I know I still had a session at my price point. Because these are mini-sessions, I usually collect my session fee prior to the session.

Next on math, figure out how long your mini- sessions will last. Stick to this number for each client and make sure they are aware of the session time and schedule. I’ll get everyone involved and have the kids sometimes push my stop watch to start the session time. Not each mini-session will go well under a tight schedule. You’ll also need to figure out scenarios before your mini sessions. If a child does not co-operate, what will you do? Offer a reshoot? Bank it for Later? Are they out of the session fee? These are all things to consider before conducting your sessions.

 2. Marketing

BabyNate (1)

Since these are mini-sessions you’ll want to market them in a way that let’s the clients know this is special and fun and LIMITED. This way you are setting the tone, that you are only taking a certain number of sessions and that this is maybe a once a year type of offer. If you offer mini-sessions constantly, they start to lose their appeal and are no longer special.

3. Do Your Homework

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Education is key to mini sessions from yourself to your clients, everyone should know what to expect. I like to email helpful information to the clients before the session. It includes a map to the location, their time slot, and  some links to clothing ideas and of course my cell phone number. On the day of the sessions, I print out a sheet of paper with family names, names of children and ages.

 

4. Make it Easy

BabyNate (4)

Don’t try to do it all, having a helper on the day of the mini-sessions can make the difference between a great day and a bad day. I did mini sessions before on my own, but towards the end of the day found myself more worn out and scattered after running back and forth from client to camera. With your assistant, give them all of the information and have them help set the family /child up for the poses. They can help primp and pose your subjects and of course they are the spotter in case you miss something you didn’t see as well as the child wrangler. They can also greet the family when they come and then help them pick up and leave after the session.

Make sure they understand this is not like your regular sessions, that they will not be able to change clothes or take time for snacks or feedings. I typically, will persuade parents of newborns to schedule a full session. It is nearly impossible to do a newborn for a mini-session and you don’t want to set their expectations to a standard that you just can’t keep.

Pick a great location. I have done both outside and studio sessions. Studio is obviously more controlled but I enjoyed being outside just for some different looks. If you choose an outdoor location, include a map and make sure it’s easy to get to. Just because you found an amazing spot in the middle of the woods, doesn’t mean it’s right for mini-sessions if no one can find it.

5. Post Session

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The back-end of the session is just as important as the first. You’ll want to streamline this as much as possible. Since it was a mini session, the number of images your clients should receive should be about 1/3 of what you normally offer. Make it as easy as possible as far as viewing and ordering. Give them expectations on the back-end as well, let them know they only have 2 weeks to order images after their gallery is released to them. Again, we are going back to the tip number one, it’s important to know your numbers when running mini-sessions.

I hope some of these tips well help you along your way in conducting successful mini-sessions.

[Blog Post and Photography by Libby for Adoramapix]

Jun 2014 24

We’ve all been there and we’ve all done it. We take an amazing picture and we hi-5 ourselves. Then we get home and load it to our computer only to find out, we cut off our subjects limb or fingers. Unfortunately, you can’t add those back in to the image but you might be able to crop  in tighter.

In this week’s Photography Bootcamp 101, we take a look at #3 in the 5 most common mistakes photographers make – limp chopping.  The human eye and what you actually captured with your camera are two completely different images and one can fool the other. However, once you learn to condition yourself when looking through the frame, you’ll find it easier to not make this mistake.

chop1

You’ll also be more confident and mindful of leaving all the digits in the frame.

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Our friend Courtney Slazinik from Click It Up A Notch sgives us great advice on avoiding this common pitfall.

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