Adoramapix

Nov 2013 12
The holiday season is approaching fast and besides the hustle and the bustle of the season, comes some amazing feasts with friends and family. Ever wanted to know how the professionals photograph food? It’s more than just taking out your iphone and uploading it to Instagram. It requires skill, creativity and precision. Here is a look at 5 tips on photographing food.
1) Don’t use the on-camera flash.
Light coming straight at the food from the direction of the camera is not flattering. Place the food near a window and have the light come in from behind or to the side. Using a tripod helps tremendously.
Shadows from back side light
2) The bigger the window, the better the light but, don’t use direct sunlight. Direct sunlight causes harsh shadows and high contrast.
Filter the light or use indirect sunlight. A white translucent shower curtain makes a good filter.  A white reflector card can be used to lighten the shadow side.
Soft Window Light
3) If your food has texture, show it. Light from the side and show the texture.
Shadows show texture so don’t be afraid of shadows.
Texture
4) Watch your background and make sure that it doesn’t take away from what you want to say in your image.
Your photo has one hero and that hero should be the food-not the props or the background.
Make the food the hero
5) If your food has height, show it. Shoot at a low camera angle.
If your food is flat, but graphical, shoot from above. If you can’t decide, try shooting from a diner’s point of view.
Graphical shot from above
Special thanks to guest blogger Jerry Deutsch of Photography by Jerry, LLC. He has a passion for food photography and has been doing for 3 1/2 years now.  His work caught my eye when I was looking through members’ photo books and his latest portfolio blew me away. If you would like to view more of his work you can check out his website at Photography by Jerry, LLC. Here also is a look at his mouthwatering Adoramapix Photo Book.
jerry
Nov 2013 07

Since our PixPublisher is so diverse and offers so many amazing assets, each week we will focus on one item to help you create an amazing photo book.

This week we want to show you how to have a smooth color fade. If you would like to have a smooth fade to a solid color you can do this using stickers. The easiest way to do this is to:

1. Open the stickers panel and type blend into the search box.

smoothblend3
2. Drag the sticker called softedge strip onto your page.

3.Rotate and stretch it so that the dark end fits against the solid color you want to blend to, and the sticker extends for the full length of the page. In the example photo below the sticker is highlighted to show where it was positioned.

4. Click on the color fill option and use the eyedropper to select the adjacent solid color so that the sticker’s edge transitions smoothly to that color.

smooth_blend2
5. To make the fade more or less gradual just stretch the height of the sticker.

 

smooth_blend
 

We hope this little tip will help you create more unique and fun designs with our PixPublisher.

Nov 2013 05

Everyone says it’s good luck when it rains on your wedding day.  However, if you’re the wedding photographer, you might be sweating bullets to make sure your couple gets as many fantastic images as if it were a sunny day.  What your couple wants is to have spectacular shots and more specifically fantastic shots outside. So as the photographer, how do you accomplish what you may think is the unattainable. It’s not as hard as you may think — here are some tips from our wedding photographer friends in the rainy upper North and NorthWest.

 

1. Be Prepared

That means, don’t place 100-percent confidence in the weather forecast. If you see rain is in the forecast, even for the day before or day after, do your research. Find locations where you can take your bride and groom where they will be undercover. Think about  opportunities like doorways, under bridges, under big trees.  These  locations will provide for a beautiful backdrop and keeps your couple dry.

rain1

 

2. Use Umbrellas

You don’t have to hide the fact that it’s raining on your couple’s wedding day. Talk to your couple about the possibility about getting some matching umbrellas. Play with the umbrellas. Change your perspective with umbrella shots. Photograph down at the umbrellas or have them take up a small portion of the frame.

swaneset-wedding-7

 

paulsylvia

 

3. Protect your Gear

Most camera gear is water resistant, this does not mean it is waterproof. There is a  huge difference. There are a lot of  gadgets and products out there to help you protect your body and lenses.  Here are some other ideas, when photographing your couple or have your assistant or even someone from the wedding party hold an umbrella over your head. You can’t handle an umbrella as well as a camera. If you are in a pinch, use a ziplock bag to protect your gear. I typically tear a small hole in it and I am able to fit my camera through it. It’s not ideal but it’s saved me a few times.

rainblog

 

4. Close Ups

Now is the time to focus on close ups. Make sure your couple gets in tight for shots. You can usually squeeze under a awning  if it’s raining. It may be tight on space, but you can go in tight – play with the veil or focus on the bride’s eyes. It’s always fun to get in for tight shots.

closeup

 

 

5. Reflections

This is the perfect time to take advantage of puddles! Yes, puddles. The reflection you get is something that is artistic and different than you would get on a rainy day. Instead of fighting the rain, embrace it.

rainblog2

 

We hope these tips help you get inspired when the rain falls on your couple’s wedding day.

Oct 2013 16

In this week’s tip for our PixPublisher, we focus on a feature that will bring color to your photo book.  One of the most power features of PixPublisher is the ability to change the color of any sticker or frame to whatever color you want. This can be done by the use of the color fill option. Changing a sticker’s color is easy, just follow these steps:

1.       Select a sticker or frame in by clicking on it.

2.       You’ll see a Color Fill option appear on the orange toolbar above the workspace.

 


3.       Click on the colored square and you’ll see the color selection panel open.

These are your choices for the new color you want to change the selected object to. You can:

a)      choose a color from the palette

b)      manually enter a color code into the input box

c)       use the eyedropper tool to pick a color by clicking anywhere on the screen.

4.       Once you’ve chosen a color, you’ll see the sticker or frame change to that color.

It’s that easy.

Changing colors is an extremely powerful feature that can be used in many creative ways. Not only can you change the colors of stickers to suit the palette for your project, you can use a combination of color fill and opacity to tint your photos by adding colored layers over them. You can also create custom colored backgrounds by re-coloring transparent overlays, and much more.

Oct 2013 15

As photographers, we all know now is the busiest time for family portraits. As much as we love to photograph happy families, we also sweat bullets wondering how we can get a great picture and keep everyone happy. There are a few tips you may want to keep in mind when tackling the family unit.

1. Get it Off the Bat

I find that with new clients and old clients one thing always seems to work. Get the formal shot right off the bat when everyone is  listening and ready. You can get the casual shots later when they all relax and they start to lose interest.  I typically will take dad and have him sit in his position so I can get a good meter reading. This way I’m not wasting valuable time by trying to have children sit still while I figure out my exposure. Next, I’ll place mom and lastly the kids. I photograph full length and 3/4 right off the top. This way the first 10-15 minutes I spend getting the posed shot and knowing everything else is extra. The following image was the 8th photo I took of the family.

stephenson-8a

 

2. Keep it Short

With younger families especially, time is crucial. Ever notice you start to lose the little one’s attention about 10 minutes in? It’s not you… it’s them. They need to be constantly moving and active. Anything more than 10-15 minutes and you’ve already lost your window.  Break after a few minutes, let them run around and relax.  Plan your next pose and start all over again.  The next image, I made everyone stand up just moments after everyone was sitting.

stephenson-174

 

3. Don’t Cut me Off

You have a lot of people in the portrait. That means you have a lot of feet and hands as well. Keep in mind to not cut off the feet or hands or fingers on full length portraits.  This is not to say you can’t get artistic and try different things.  Just make sure on the family formal portrait you get everything included in the first round, then you can experiment. Here you’ll see ll fingers and toes are accounted for in this image.

stephenson-19

 

4. Hold On

Little ones are active. It’s hard for them to sit still. Telling a child to put their hands down constantly while everyone else is ready  is stressful to the family. Keep it simple and give the little one something to hold in their hands.  Give them something seasonal, like say for instance a leaf or a pine cone to play with, this will keep their hands busy. If you look closely at this image, you’ll see the youngest has a small leaf in her hand.

stephenson-37

 

5. Loosen Up

Every family is quirky. It’s important to capture this as well. You know you got the formal pictures right off the top of the session, so now it’s time to have some fun. Loosen up and let them to hug or kiss. I typically say, tickle the funniest person in your family. The images are fun and relaxed and unexpected. It’s ok if not everyone is looking into the camera, the smile on their faces is worth a million bucks.

stephenson-177

 

written by Michelle Libby for Adoramapix

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